Episode 33: Paul Mecca: How to Build a Business by Identifying Areas of Potential Growth

Who is Paul Mecca and the key takeaways in this episode?

In years to come, the secret to building a successful business will still remain the same. Find the need and provide a solution to that need. Paul Mecca, Co-Founder of KwikBoost, had that in mind when he and his brother Joe started with their business. Their main mission is to solve the growing problem of the need for access to power in public places, specifically for mobile devices. Surely enough, the business idea has fueled itself and has resulted in what is now KwikBoost.

In this episode, we’ll explore and learn more about:

  • How Paul and his brother started the business
  • Why he thinks attitude plays a big role in business success
  • His future plans for KwikBoost
  • What company he admires most and why

The Questions

[2:21] What made you the guy you are today?
Answer: I think probably the biggest thing was just how I was raised by my father who is an entrepreneur, and how he approached life, and you hear it, it’s cliché, your parents tell you how you can do anything. The truth is my dad told me that and he showed me how to do that. I think that was a big difference for me, that he was actually leading the way and saying: “Look, you can do anything you want, any sort of times, push the limit, push the boundaries,” as I was growing up. He showed me how to be confident, gave me what I call practical intelligence, which is something that I feel like you can really only learn at a young age from parents and people that you’re close to.

[7:47] Now, let’s dig in to KwikBoost for a moment. Tell the listeners what KwikBoost is and how you came up with the idea?
Answer: So KwikBoost, plain and simple, is mobile device charging stations for public places. So you think about places like college campuses, airports, hospitals, theme parks, stadiums, malls, anywhere where people are spending time. Obviously, they’ve got their most important belonging, which is their phone, their tablet, their music player, whatever it might be. But most importantly, we think about the phone. And when that phone relies on power, you never know when and where you’re going to be, you might be at 0% or 20%, and you know what you’ve got ahead of you, and you need to make sure that you’re going to be able to use that very important device. So what we’ve created is several different products that solve that problem and make it easy for the facility to offer that to their customers. So whether it’s a college campus, providing that as a service for students, or an airport providing it as a service for travelers, it’s something that is a very, very common problem. Obviously, we’ve all been there. We’ve all had our phone dead or dying, and not been able to use it the way we’d like to. And so, four or five years ago, my brother Joe and I identified this problem through – we were working on another project and this came up. And the more that we thought about it and looked at it, we thought, “Man, this is going to grow. There’s going to be a huge need for this. Let’s get out there and solve it.” It’s worked out really well for us. We built a great business around solving what is really a pretty basic but very common problem, and that’s the need to charge your phone when you’re out and on the go.

[20:55] What tip would you give an entrepreneur that they’re building their business, they’re building their brand, and they’re trying to attract the quality people to build a culture that’s successful? Is there a tip you’d give them?
Answer: I think the biggest tip, and I think a lot of people would agree with this, and I’ve learned this lesson a couple of times now unfortunately, is: “Don’t hire your friends.” And there are friends out there that can make it work, so I don’t want to just say believe this statement, but it’s challenging because it can have a direct impact on your culture in a negative way.  There are friends out there that you think will have a positive impact, but the problem is you bring them in and you’ve got – There’s a pre-existing relationship, there are pre-existing experiences and things that you’ve gone through with them. Maybe you worked for them somewhere else, maybe you grew up with them. Maybe they’re perfect for the job you’re bringing them in for from the outside looking in, but it’s hard to get past some of the things. It’s almost better to just go get someone new that you’ve never met, interview them a couple of times, put them through some evaluations, and bring them in; to just start fresh and get to know somebody new, all of their life experiences.

Culture According to Paul Mecca:

I think for us, attitude is huge. I’m real big on positive energy. Not only in my personal life, but in business. I’ll pull a guy, I’ll pull a salesman off the floor and say, “Hey, look, I get it. You’ve lost a deal or a deal got downsized, but you got to get the vibe out. So go get some food or something, and come back and we don’t want that around. I get why you’re maybe a little down.” So attitude, energy, is real big. That vibe that we’ve got going. I think I like to have a very positive, excited, happy, fun place to work. But at the same, it’s very focused, very driven and very competitive. That’s something that we’ve always taken pride in as being the experts, being the leaders, and not getting lazy or complacent with how we’re selling our products, or how we’re handling our customers. We’re real big on support. And I think all of those things feed into the success that we’ve had.

Go To Quote for Inspiration

Book Recommendations:

  • “Outliers” by Malcolm Gladwell

What Paul Mecca Wants His Company Culture to BE:

  • BE Fun
  • BE Aggressive
  • BE Dedicated

Links and Resources Mentioned in this Interview:

Where to Find Paul Mecca:

Connect with John on

FULL EPISODE TRANSCRIPT

 

John: Paul, welcome to BE Culture Radio. How are you this morning?

Paul: I’m good, John. How are you?

John: Great. Thanks for coming on. I hope it’s lovely there in the Southwest this morning. We see the sun here in the Northeast, though I’m sure it’s nicer there than it is here.

Paul: Oh yeah, it’s a beautiful day, beautiful week. It’s finally turned around and spring is here.

John: For my listeners, Paul, tell them where you’re located.

Paul: We’re in Dallas, Texas.

John: And it’s probably about 70 degrees every day, right?

Paul: Yeah, that sounds about right, 70.

John: We’re going to get up to 37 today. But we think that’s balmy because the sun’s out.

Paul: Wow, thank you.

John: It’s pretty. So to my listeners, now, Paul and I know each other prior to the show. We do business together. I represent his project, which I think is one of the cooler products out in the marketplace; KwikBoost, it’s an awesome product. It allows you to do your company branding, provide a service to the people that you work with and people that visit, and it’s just such a cool product. But, Paul, before we get into that, let’s talk about you a little bit. What made you the guy you are today? Where did you come from? How did you arrive? What created Paul?

Paul: You know, I think probably the biggest thing was just how I was raised by my father who is an entrepreneur, and how he approached life, and you hear it, it’s cliché, your parents tell you how you can do anything. The truth is my dad told me that and he showed me how to do that. I think that was a big difference for me, that he was actually leading the way and saying: “Look, you can do anything you want, any sort of times, push the limit, push the boundaries,” as I was growing up. He showed me how to be confident, gave me what I call practical intelligence, which is something that I feel like you can really only learn at a young age from parents and people that you’re close to.

John: As I like to say, everybody has to have a tribe. I’m one of eight, or as my mother would say, she has eight only-children. And it’s true if you come from a place where you’re expected to overreach and over-succeed, and nobody’s a victim, that everybody has an opportunity to be whatever it is they wish to be. I think it drives you in a different manner when you become an adult.

Paul: You’re right. You’re actually very right.

John: And I just feel sorry for our poor children. They must think we’re insane. I know mine do. Mine look at me sometimes and are like, “Dad, you are killing me.” But I try to give them the direction. The one thing you want for your tribe and for your immediate family is for them not to make the same mistakes you made and go through the same pain that you went through. But I’m not sure that that gives them – if you come from the fires, it’s what chiseled you, Paul. So if you don’t make those mistakes and you don’t feel that pain, how do you develop? What culture do you immerse yourself in? And that’s the question I always like to ask people when I meet them, and especially people like you who we know each other. Paul, how do you deal with that?

Paul: How do I deal?

John: How do you get that across to the next generation is my point. How do you get – you know what, we’ve been through our struggles, we saw our parents struggle. They tried to make it a better world for us, we’re trying to make it a better world for them, but they still, they have to make mistakes to learn things. So how do you make them understand that? And then, you have the other side and say, “Oh God, don’t let it happen to them.”

Paul: That’s true. Right now, I don’t have any kids, so I can’t relate to that. But just even with my employees and with friends and working with younger people, it’s one of those things where obviously letting them trip and fall a few times is something that is going to build them up. We’ve all been there. I think anybody that’s been successful has made mistakes. They had failures and that’s what built them up. Early on, before I got into KwikBoost and we started this company, I had other business ideas and projects. And some of those things may have worked if I had stuck with it whereas some of them flat out didn’t work. But all of those failures led into the successes we’re having today. I learned a lot from going down some of those paths. And I think that one of the most important things is that people get out there, that they’re prepared to take some lumps and get knocked down a few times. And most importantly, they need to know that you can always get up, dust off and try again.

John: Well, you said you haven’t have the pleasure of having children yet, and I hope that everybody does. It’s not for everybody, but I would share with you that I do believe there’s a very close correlation between having a company and working, and you start your own company and the people around you. That’s your tribe, that’s your people.

Paul: Absolutely.

John: And a lot of times, there are younger people you’re with, and you try to keep them from making the same mistakes you made.

Paul: Yeah.

John: And there’s that weird moment where they’re saying, “Are you telling me what to do or are you trying to help?”

Paul: Yeah, exactly.

John: And how do you deal with that?

Paul: We’ve got a good group here. And obviously, with time, we’ve gotten better at finding the people that fit into our mold and fit into our tribe. I think that’s a really good way of describing it. There are times when there are people who are completely trainable and coachable, and very malleable, but they’re just maybe not getting it. And then, you’ve got people that seem like they’re dense and you can’t get through to them, but then you start to see some of those things come out in their actions and what they’re doing. So for me, I think it’s just about being consistent and working with everybody, treating them like I absolutely care about their success, not only here but in life. Of course, I care about it here. It directly impacts my own success. And so, I think that that’s a benefit and you know how that feels. When your employees know that, “Hey, he really cares and maybe it’s because it’s his company, but he’s not telling me anything.” I get here, I work with all of these guys. And that’s something that’s part of leading by example, showing that this is the type of commitment that it takes to be successful. And I get it, you may not work until 8 o’clock at night every night, but I’ll be here, so you can see that someone is here thinking about this company that you work for, as much as I possibly can. So it’s just consistency that I think is a huge part of that.

John: Now, let’s dig in to KwikBoost for a moment. Tell the listeners what KwikBoost is and how you came up with the idea.

Paul: So KwikBoost, plain and simple, is mobile device charging stations for public places. So you think about places like college campuses, airports, hospitals, theme parks, stadiums, malls, anywhere where people are spending time. Obviously, they’ve got their most important belonging, which is their phone, their tablet, their music player, whatever it might be. But most importantly, we think about the phone. And when that phone relies on power, you never know when and where you’re going to be, you might be at 0% or 20%, and you know what you’ve got ahead of you, and you need to make sure that you’re going to be able to use that very important device. So what we’ve created is several different products that solve that problem and make it easy for the facility to offer that to their customers. So whether it’s a college campus providing that as a service for students, or an airport providing it as a service for travelers, it’s something that is a very, very common problem. Obviously, we’ve all been there. We’ve all had our phone dead or dying, and not been able to use it the way we’d like to. And so, four or five years ago, my brother Joe and I identified this problem through – we were working on another project and this came up. And the more that we thought about it and looked at it, we thought, “Man, this is going to grow. There’s going to be a huge need for this. Let’s get out there and solve it.” It’s worked out really well for us. We built a great business around solving what is really a pretty basic but very common problem, and that’s the need to charge your phone when you’re out and on the go.

John: I tell my listeners I find KwikBoost for us to be one of the most innovative products. We have it, as I tell my listeners, at BE Furniture we have a 15,000 square foot showroom the guests come in all the time. In the middle of my showroom is a KwikBoost product. Now, you would not know it’s a KwikBoost product because it’s branded with my company. And it’s the best $900 I ever spent. And it is a great product. People come in all the time. They walk in and they’re visiting. And they’re like, “Oh, my tablet,” or an Android phone, or “My iPhone.” It charges them all and it does it within a very short period time over here. And people are like, “Where do I get one?” I’m like, “Well, I just happen to be a distributor of it.” So I say it with a great deal of pride because people need to understand that, for me, I can distribute any product I want to. I chose KwikBoost not only because of the product, guys, but because of Paul and the integrity they show when they go to market. And I always refer to character as what people do when you’re not looking. And Paul and I had a situation a while back. It wasn’t pleasant, but he showed tremendous character and said, “Well, this is what happened and it wasn’t supposed to happen, and I take full responsibility for it.” And it was just very refreshing versus the double talk that we have all experienced, Paul. And I see that you have a different culture in your company, which is why I resonated with you when I first met you. And today, I still hold you in the same regard, if not higher, because of how you behaved through difficult times. And not only I mean difficult times, like that big problem, but it’s a situation that could have been messy but you just said, “Hey, we made a mistake. I’m sorry. How do I make it right?”

Paul: Yeah.

John: And that doesn’t happen a lot. And you’re to be commended for it.

Paul: Well, I appreciated that. That’s another thing that I attribute back to my father; it’s just be fair, be transparent, again, be consistent, and treat people the way you’d like to be treated. And I think that we see a lot of really great advantages in working with your company. And that’s the relationship that we want to keep really strong. So that was an easy situation for me to get my head around and know which way to move.

John: Now, did you have a tipping point to the process when you were starting your company? Was there a monumental event that happened for you and Joe when you said, “Hey!” Because I’ve got to tell you, there can’t be anything cooler than doing it with your own tribe, your own brother, and building this. But was there a moment when the lights went on for the two of you?

Paul: I think what comes to mind for me was early on in 2011 when we sketched up a product and started prototyping it. And by the end of the year, we were introducing it, and just sitting down, cold calling universities and a couple of other markets, but mostly colleges. And just pretty much right away, we had people very interested in the product. And I think to be a little more specific, there was a school. We’re in Dallas and there’s a school, Oklahoma State, where at the student union, a guy named Mitch Kilcrease e-mailed me back after getting a voice mail. We didn’t even have a website at the time, which is funny to think about. And he said, “Hey, I’m really interested in this. This is a problem that we’re having on campus. Can you come up here and show it to me?” And I remember telling Joe, as it was me and Joe at the time, and that was it. And I said, “Hey, it’s like a three-and-a-half hour drive. What do we do?” And we got in the car, maybe two days later, I think, and drove up there. And I remember I was cold calling the whole way up there. He was driving, I was still calling people at other schools. And we got up there and just seeing their reaction, he had staff in the office, and seeing the way that they got it; they understood what we had. And it just immediately, we knew that, “Hey, this guy invited us up here to show off a product.” He placed an order on-site. And for us, that’s just a moment that I always think about where it wasn’t the first couple of stations we sold, but it was the first deal where someone said, “Hey, you solved the problem that we’re having.” And they bought quite a few stations and they continued to be an on-going customer. And it just stands out as a moment for me when I felt, when I went home, and I thought, “Man, we’re really on to something. This guy took time out of his day and we’ve been able to duplicate that many times over.”

John: Now, let’s shift gears a little bit, Paul, and let’s talk about culture a little bit. Can you define for all our listeners what you hold dear about culture and what you define as company culture for you and your firm?

Paul: I think for us, attitude is huge. I’m real big on positive energy. Not only in my personal life, but in business. I’ll pull a guy, I’ll pull a salesman off the floor and say, “Hey, look, I get it. You’ve lost a deal or a deal got downsized, but you got to get the vibe out. So go get some food or something, and come back and we don’t want that around. I get why you’re maybe a little down.” So attitude, energy, is real big. That vibe that we’ve got going. I think I like to have a very positive, excited, happy, fun place to work. But at the same, it’s very focused, very driven and very competitive. That’s something that we’ve always taken pride in as being the experts, being the leaders, and not getting lazy or complacent with how we’re selling our products, or how we’re handling our customers. We’re real big on support. And I think all of those things feed into the success that we’ve had.

John: Maybe you could tell us a story on how your culture accelerated your business. Is there a situation that comes to mind when you said, “You know what, here’s a perfect example of what happens?”

Paul: Yeah, I think in a lot of ways some of the key hires that we’ve made in the identifying and just interviewing process that – “Hey, this person fits the culture that we want to have.” In fact, this happened without saying anything to these people. It was like they had read our secret book about what we want as a culture and at an individual level as well. And some of those people have had huge impacts on our company, doing things that Joe and I just flat out couldn’t do or didn’t have, couldn’t provide enough time or attention for that. It could be in the sales role; it could be in the production role; it could be marketing, design. I feel like we’ve brought in some really good people that every day, day in and day out, they bring it, and they work hard, and they want this company to grow. And I think that’s one of the things that we’ve done is we’ve put them in a position to show them: “Look, you’re having an impact on this company every day.” And there’s a lot of places where you maybe don’t get to see that, and that goes back into just being transparent and saying, “Here are our goals. Here’s where we’re at. Here’s what you’re doing.” And that’s exciting for someone to experience, especially as we’re a little bit of a younger company. And so for some of these people, this may be their second or third, or maybe first, job. And maybe we’re spoiling them because they’ll go work somewhere else some day and it won’t be as exciting. But I think if anything, to your question, just I can identify a few people that work here today where their resonating with our culture was the reason that we hired them, and it’s been a great decision.

John: I have told my listeners this. I think the product is innovative and really cutting edge and cool. The other 50% and probably more was the people and the approach. When I first talked with the account executive, when I first started the conversation, it was refreshing to hear the excitement and belief and conviction in their voice. And I get to see hundreds of vendors and talk to hundreds of vendors a week. This was a different experience for me. As a matter of fact, I even had said to her, “I want to talk to Paul.” And I don’t know if you remember that. But I’m like, “I get it.” And I think your product is really cool, but your people are cooler.

Paul: And I think that’s important that the customers feel that too. I think even going back to the early days. I had only really been out of college two or three years when we say that, time travels, four or five years, let’s leave it at that. And when we started calling, I just felt like I had a connection with the college campus still, and I think that’s one of the reasons that we sort of jumped into that market. And I believe that that came out when I was talking to those customers, that they could feel that connection, and something that we shared. And it certainly had a big impact on the growth of the company. So we’ve tried to find those people as well that are cool and fun, and want to work hard, and of course, make money. But most importantly, the customer talks to them and feels that positive energy that you’re talking about.

John: We feel it from Liz. Hey, she’s great.

Paul: She’s full of energy, for sure.

John: She is. Hey, let’s shift gears a little bit because we talked about the people side of it. Let’s talk about the physical side of it. Let’s talk about the facilities because I want to know from your perspective, does your facility, does your office design match your culture, and how does that help you retain the employees you have, and how does it help you get new employees and attract the millennials? Because you and I have had this discussion many times, Paul. Your product is a product for the millennials coming to the market, and you’re looking to that demographic to drive your business. So how do you structure the office design itself so it meets their needs? Because they’re not the baby boomers. They’re not going to go sit in a cubicle farm to just get a job.

Paul: Yeah, I think that that’s a really great question. We in November – So all summer last year, we built out a brand new space. It was easy for us because we were able to get the building next door to where we were and we built out a huge new office, and moved in November. And so we’ve been here five, six months. It’s been a great thing for us. Now, our old space was great as well. It was a very cool, very hip, very open space. And everybody liked it and we loved to have customers over when we had the chance. But our new space is very open. We have a big, open sales area, where all the sales people are working very closely together, collaborating, sharing ideas, hearing each other. It’s easy to train that way because you put them into the room and it’s like big brother, big sister, working with the little sibling, and helping them get their feet moving. All of our offices, including my office – I’ve got a window that looks out – So we’ve got windows, so that everything is very open. I can, without going out of my office, actually walk into the next office. And so we’ve got doors connecting all the offices. And we wanted the energy and the creativity and just everything that we’re doing to flow through our physical space. And I feel like it’s worked really, really well. We’ve got a fun place. When you know you’ve got it is when employees are hanging out after work and on Fridays, for a couple of hours, and maybe we’ve got a pool table, we’re playing pool, and drinking a beer, and just talking about the sale that they closed. That’s when you know you’ve got a cool place and a good culture. People, they want to be there, even when work’s over.

John: That’s cool. What tip would you give an entrepreneur when they’re building their business, they’re building their brand, and they’re trying to attract the quality people to build a culture that’s successful? Is there a tip you’d give them?

Paul: I think the biggest tip, and I think a lot of people would agree with this, and I’ve learned this lesson a couple of times now unfortunately, is: “Don’t hire your friends.” And there are friends out there that can make it work, so I don’t want to just say believe this statement, but it’s challenging because it can have a direct impact on your culture in a negative way.  There are friends out there that you think will have a positive impact, but the problem is you bring them in and you’ve got – There’s a pre-existing relationship, there are pre-existing experiences and things that you’ve gone through with them. Maybe you worked for them somewhere else, maybe you grew up with them. Maybe they’re perfect for the job you’re bringing them in for from the outside looking in, but it’s hard to get past some of the things. It’s almost better to just go get someone new that you’ve never met, interview them a couple of times, put them through some evaluations, and bring them in; to just start fresh and get to know somebody new, all of their life experiences. So I think that’s something that when you bring in a friend, it can have an impact on your culture that you never planned on. You thought, “They’re going to come in here and be exactly the way that we want this thing to be.” And they might even try really hard. But some of the things – And what happens is that it doesn’t fit, it doesn’t work. You’re in a tough spot in trying to make it work, and go to them and say, “Hey, can we do this? Can we try this? Can you be this way?” Meanwhile, you’ve got your whole other group that didn’t maybe know this person, and are completely new people to your life and to your company, and everything is working great. So something that comes to mind right away is: just go out there and meet new people, and build your business with people that you didn’t know before. I had the advantage. I’ve had a great advantage and a great experience in working with my brother. And he’s arguably my best friend, anyways. But that’s different, we grew up working together, whether it’s mowing lawns or lifeguarding. Whatever it might be, we’ve done that and we’re attached to the hip most of the time. So it’s different than someone that’s not in your tribe, as you say. I think it’s really fun to get out there and find new people that want to work with you and want to build something that’s exciting. And quite frankly, I found it to be a lot more exciting than working with somebody that you’ve known for since high school or college, or longer, from another job.

John: Yeah, I’d always like to say when you hire that friend and it didn’t work out, you lost friend and an employee.

Paul: Yeah, exactly.

John: Better known as a “twofer.”

Paul: Yeah, you’re very right. And I’ve been there a couple of times and that’s what happens.

John: That’s not a pleasant feeling. Hey, let me ask you this. What is the most common mistake you see entrepreneurs make when they’re trying to build that successful culture in business? Is there a common thread you see that you’ve seen in the past that repeats itself?

Paul: I think so. I think a lot of the times, especially with younger entrepreneurs, you get into a situation where – and this was something where it’s easy to go down this path because you see shows like Shark Tank, for example, and we’re in this very, very connected interwoven society now where you can get your idea out there. You can get your idea on something like Kickstart or Indiegogo. And you get all those validations that you have this great idea, and it gets to your head. And you might have a great product, but as I would say, the product is like 5% of what you’re going to do with any business. It’s really, at the end of the day, the first thing and it’s a very important thing, but it’s everything else that’s going to build that successful company. And so, I think a lot of entrepreneurs have a great idea and they based their whole strategy on, “Hey, I’ve got this great idea. So I can’t really do anything wrong.” And so they assume that they know things that they don’t know. And my advice for that is: find some advisors, find some people; surround yourself with people that you trust, that have your best interest in mind, that don’t have money in the business. Maybe they will someday, but initially they don’t. Lean on them and let them know that, “Hey, this is what I want from you. This is what I’m trying to get. I don’t know these things.” You don’t know all of these things. But if you have the right people, you can get the bits and pieces from everybody to solve a lot of the problems you’ll encounter. So for me, it was just – I’d like to think I’m a pretty humble guy, and it’s something that my dad always told me. It’s like you don’t know what you don’t know, and just assume that there’s a lot of things that you don’t know, and learn all the time and put people around yourself to learn. So I think you don’t rush in and think, “I’ve got this. I’ve got it made. My friends and neighbors are telling me to go on Shark Tank, and I’m going to be the next Mark Zuckerberg or something.” That’s really hard to achieve, especially if you don’t have the right people around you and that are getting into your ear and saying, “Hey, that’s a crazy idea. That’s not going to work. Let’s talk about that.” Or “Hey, that’s not a good hire. Let me introduce you to some other people.” So I think that’s a big thing for me.

John: I can’t agree with you more and I was raised in an environment where my parents and my older siblings always put it out there. So just assume that everybody around you knows more than you, before you open your mouth.

Paul: Yeah.

John: And that will make you pause for a moment, won’t it?

Paul: Yeah, and it might make you a little quiet sometimes. But at the end of the day, you’re sitting there absorbing information and knowledge that will make you smarter, and you’ll have your time to speak up and be the knowledgeable source on things.

John: Let me ask you this. Let’s talk about KwikBoost for a moment. What are your growth plans? Can you share that with your listeners?

Paul: Yeah, definitely. I think for us, obviously power is a moving target. There’s a lot of exciting things happening. Right now, wireless charging is really starting to catch on, and that’s something that we’ve been working on for several years, just waiting for “When is this going to be relevant and something that we can sell and something that people are looking for?” Solar is emerging and becoming more and more feasible and practical for companies like KwikBoost, and all types of companies, to invest in and build products and services around. So for us, our focus is power and mobile. Anything mobile. We’re not building apps or doing things like that, but doing things that support the use of a mobile device, especially in public places and places where you’re likely to have a problem using your device. So that could be even connectivity, messaging services, and things like that. But most importantly power, mobile, and just focusing on our customers and the people who we’re working with today. Partners like you, John. Making sure that – We don’t want to have success and then take steps backwards. We want to maintain what we’ve built.

John: Perfect. Alright, Paul, I’m going to take you to the lightning round, okay?

Paul: Good.

John: Is there a book that changed your life?

Paul: For me, a lot of people probably read the book “Outliers” by Malcolm Gladwell, I think it’s eye-opening, it touches on a lot of things that we’ve talked about. It tells you a lot about how success is what you make it and has nothing to do with some magical idea or anything like that. It’s all about hard work and just time.

John: Do you have a quote you go to for inspiration?

Paul: For me, what I think about, whether it’s early morning, early morning flight or late night at the office, is I just tell myself, “Nothing works if you don’t.”

John: I like that. Is there a company that you admire in relation to culture other than yours?

Paul: A few. I haven’t actually been at these companies. And I don’t know for sure, but from what I can see, I really admire Disney. I think that’s a company that, for a long time, has been extremely creative in what they’ve done. And of course, they bought Pixar and that was Steve Jobs, and they really changed the whole – and I don’t watch those types of movies, to be honest with you – but I look at that company and I think there’s got to be some really, really creative people working there and a lot of creative freedom for them to come up with the products that they’re coming up with. And so, I like that. And another one would be Tesla. I just think what they’re doing as a company is leading the way; they set out, and said, “You know what, we’re going to focus completely on the electric vehicle.” And I think one of the things I admire is how Elon Musk and that company has said, “We’re going to actually make our IP public, because we know this is the future. And we want people to have access to some of the things that we’ve discovered and invented, so that we can have electric vehicles out there much sooner than if everybody’s being secretive and keeping technology away from each other, because it’s a revolutionary thing for our world to be using power that way.” And it is something that should be shared. So I think that’s really interesting to me, that he has made that decision to share his IP and promote that market in such a positive way.

John: He’s a really cool guy. Hey, Paul, let me ask you this question about your company during the lightning round, why should people buy KwikBoost?

Paul: This is a problem we’re solving. We’ve got a great solution.

John: You do, and I’m here to tell my listeners, I believe in it. I have it on my floor. It’s the best $900 you’re ever going to spend. Now, here we go, a big finish, Paul. And you’re going to have to humor me because when you answer this, you’ve got to start with “BE” as in BE Culture Radio, okay?

Paul: Okay.

John: If you had to describe the culture of KwikBoost in three words, what would they be?

Paul: BE fun, BE aggressive and BE dedicated.

John: BE fun. BE aggressive and BE dedicated. And folks, they certainly are. Paul, how can my listeners connect with you?

Paul: So you can e-mail me directly. That’s something that I’m always open to. And that’s Paul, “P-A-U-L,” @kwikboost.com. And that’s “K-W-I-K” boost.com. Or go to our website, www.kwikboost.com. It is a different spelling, “K-W-I-K.” Facebook, Twitter, all those things. Any of those ways, but I love getting e-mails and I love working with the customers. Even if it’s someone who is going to buy a few stations. I learn stuff every time, and that’s knowledge that I can share with my team.

John: Any significant rollouts that you want to share with our listeners?

Paul: We’ve got some really cool stuff that we’ll be introducing later this year. I think the biggest thing is we’re trying to – The outlet is very important to our product but we’ve got some solutions that will make it not as important. I’ll leave it at that.

John: Cool, and we’ll be sending that out. You’ll see that on the BE Furniture website later in the year when he rolls out. You’ll be able to mirror it right through us. Now, Paul, I want to thank you so much for your time. But before we end our interview, I always share with my guest my favorite quote from Maya Angelou which is “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did but people will never forget how you made them feel.” And I hope today, we’ve made you feel welcome and part of our tribe.

Paul: Absolutely. This has been a lot of fun. I appreciate you letting me join the show. And I’ll be listening from now on.

John: We’re going to have to come back in about six months and you can tell us about the rollout because I know a little bit about the rollout. I’m not going to be the spoiler, but it’s pretty cool.

Paul: Yeah, we’re really excited.

John: You should be. It’s a really cool company. If you guys get the chance, take a look at his website. The product is phenomenal. People are great. Paul, thank you so much for your time today.

Paul: Thank you, John, you have a great day.

John: Talk to you soon, my friend. BE well.

Paul: You too.

John: Bye-bye.